Just by Jenny Morton Potts @jmortonpotts #BlogTour #Interview & #Giveaway @rararesources

Happy Friday!

Today I have a lovely interview with Jenny Morton Potts for you, as part of her Just blog tour.

Just Banner

Many thanks to Rachel @ Rachel’s Random Resources.

Interview with Jenny Morton Potts…..

For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

I’m a writer, a wife and mother. I put writer first deliberately, since it seems to most fully define me; like I’m of the writer species. I used to write literature (which I miss) and now I write thrillers (which I love too). I’m also doing memoir for a ballet dancer at the moment and working on another book which is a literary collaboration about the cello. It’s not nearly as dull as it sounds. You don’t need any knowledge of the cello (I personally have none, except I like listening to it) to enjoy the book. The same can be said for the ballet memoir. I just aim for cracking good reads.

Where did/do you get your ideas from?

I found a little box in the attic which has a dusty old label marked, ‘Fantastic ideas for novels’ and I just dip into that. No, I’m kidding. Ideas just come at me constantly, like one of those tennis ball machines. I could never create the time to write up and around all my ideas.

Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

Not knowingly. There are a lot of things which happen to them which are real events from my life but no, I don’t use the people I know as characters. They are just too villainous; no-one would believe in them.

How do you pick your characters names?

I’m very fussy about my characters’ names. They have to feel perfect. And the syllables have to have the right balance from first name to surname. So that usually, if a character has a two syllable first name, they will have a one syllable surname, and vice versa. I am always scouring the world for names to use. One that I had my eye on recently is Wragg and another is Prayor. I like names like that which sound like solicitors. So they will probably be cropping up soon.

Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?

No mystery. 9 to 5, pretty much. I don’t stop for breaks, just nip to the kitchen for tea. I don’t take any days off while I’m writing a book, no weekends. I will start off by re-reading the previous day’s work and editing that. (If I don’t, then I can’t clear my head of it. I’m a tidy, organised person; methodical.) Then I move onto fresh material. I keep all the work in folders on my laptop: marketing, synopsis, chapter headings, ideas (outlines, one liners, etc), cover. I have a cabin I write in but I could do it anywhere, and frequently do.

Who are your top 5 favourite authors?

E M Forster, E Annie Proulx, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Mary Dorcey, Kate Millett

If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?

It would be Mary Dorcey and I’d say, ‘What can I do to persuade you to write another novel?’

Were you a big reader as a child?

Not huge. But I read quite grown up books. My family weren’t big readers and so I was never ‘introduced’ to books or encouraged to read. I just found some interesting ones kicking around and my tummy would turn over when I realised this clever, thrilling stuff was out there.

When did you start to write?

I was probably about nine. I wrote plays and produced, directed, performed them. I did this with all my friends and it was a treasured time. We were in hysterics constantly and it was a challenge to get through the performances.

If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?

I would never change an ending to a book. I have never felt I wanted to. Even if it is disappointing, or incredibly sad, it’s what was intended.

Is there a book you wish you had written?

Oh God, almost everything I read. All of Margaret Attwood’s.

If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?

That’s a fab question. Something irreverent, I guess. Or some silly Victoria Wood quote which has no appropriateness at all, like ‘We shall have fog by teatime’.

If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?

I would probably take one of my own characters. I like them so much. Lucienne Langbrook, I think, who is in my new book, Just. She really needs a friend and I need to persuade her that she’s not nearly as uptight as she thinks she is.

What are you working on right now?

A memoir for a famous ballet dancer.

Do you have a new release due?

Yeah! My fabulous new thriller, Just!

What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?

I lie low till sunset, then sip a glass of bubbly, trying not to panic about reviews.

How can readers keep in touch with you?

Readers are welcome to contact me in any way they wish. Email, Facebook, Twitter, coffee in a café.

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

I’m really good at super fiendish sudoku and I’m not a bad bridge player.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, Jenny!

Kerry. x

My great pleasure, Kerry! Jenny x

Just cover

Just

How far would you go to save a life?

On golden Mediterranean sands, maverick doctor Scott Langbrook falls recklessly in love with his team leader, Fiyori Maziq. If only that was the extent of his falling, but Scott descends into the hellish clutches of someone much more sinister.

‘Just’ is a story of love and loss, of terror and triumph. Set in idyllic Cambridge and on the shores of the Med and Cornwall, our characters fight for their very lives on land and at sea.

An unforgettable novel which goes to the heart of our catastrophic times, and seeks salvation.

Jenny Morton Potts on Amazon

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jenny-Morton-Potts/e/B00OIYYVPY/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1527096532&sr=1-1

Author Bio

Jenny Morton Potts

Jenny is a novelist, screenplay writer, and playwright. After a series of ‘proper jobs’, she realized she was living someone else’s life and escaped to Gascony to make gîtes. Knee deep in cement and pregnant, Jenny was happy. Then autism and a distracted spine surgeon wiped out the order. Returned to wonderful England, to write her socks off.

Jenny would like to see the Northern Lights but worries that’s the best bit and should be saved till last. Very happily, and gratefully, settled with the family. She tries not to take herself too seriously.

Social Media Links –

http://www.jennymortonpotts.com/

https://twitter.com/jmortonpotts?lang=en

https://facebook.com/jennymortonpotts

https://www.goodreads.com/jennymortonpotts

Giveaway –

Win  5 x e-copies of Just by Jenny Morton Potts (Open Internationally)

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter link below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then I reserve the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time I will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

Check out the rest of the blog tour for reviews, and more, with these awesome book bloggers…..

Just Full Banner

Enjoy!

 

Advertisements

No Ordinary Killing by Jeff Dawson @jeffdaw #BlogTour #GuestPost @canelo_co @ElliePilcher95

Hi all!

Today I have the pleasure of joining in with Jeff Dawson’s No Ordinary Killing blog tour!

No Ordinary Killing Blog Tour Final

Many thanks to Ellie Pilcher, at Canelo, for the opportunity to take part.

 

Title: No Ordinary Killing

Author Name: Jeff Dawson

Previous Books (if applicable): N/A

 Genre: Historical Crime, Mystery Thriller

 Release Date: 28th May 2018

Publisher: Canelo

Cover Image: No Ordinary Killing cover

Book Blurb: The Empire has a deadly secret…

1899, South Africa:  As the Boer War rages, Captain Ingo Finch of the Royal Army Medical Corps pieces together casualties at the front. Then, recovering in Cape Town, he is woken by local police. A British officer has been murdered, and an RAMC signature is required for the post-mortem.

Shocked by the identity of the victim, the bizarre nature of the crime and what appears a too-convenient resolution, Finch turns detective. He is soon thrust into a perilous maze of espionage and murder.

Along with an Australian nurse, Annie, and an escaped diamond miner, Mbutu, Finch finds he has stumbled on a terrifying secret, one that will shake the Empire to its core…

An extraordinary and unputdownable historical crime thriller and Kindle bestseller, perfect for readers Philip Kerr, M.J. Carter and Abir Mukherjee.

 Links to Book:

Amazon (UK)

Kobo (UK)

Google Books (UK)

Apple Books (UK)

Author Bio:

Jeff Dawson is a journalist and author. He has been a long-standing contributor to The Sunday Times Culture section, writing regular A-list interview-led arts features (interviewees including the likes of Robert De Niro, George Clooney, Dustin Hoffman, Hugh Grant, Angelina Jolie, Jerry Seinfeld and Nicole Kidman). He is also a former US Editor of Empire magazine.

Jeff is the author of three non-fiction books — Tarantino/Quentin Tarantino: The Cinema of Cool, Back Home: England And The 1970 World Cup, which The Times rated “truly outstanding”, and Dead Reckoning: The Dunedin Star Disaster, the latter nominated for the Mountbatten Maritime Prize.

Author Photo: Jeff Dawson

Author Social Media Links

Twitter: @jeffdaw

Guest post…..

No Ordinary Killing and the Boer War

A few years ago I lived on a street called Ladysmith Road. It joined another one called Kimberley, both thoroughfares of solid, red-brick terracing. Show me any British suburb built around 1900 and I will give you roads called Ladysmith and Kimberley, Mafeking too – named after towns besieged, then jubilantly relieved, during the Boer War – officially Second Boer War – of 1899-1902.

There’s evidence enough that the Boer War was deeply etched into late-Victorian/early-Edwardian society. The reminders live on – in those steep “Kop” ends at football grounds (most famously at Liverpool FC); in the good old Boy Scouts, set up by a general (Baden-Powell) to inspire and improve army recruiting.

At the war’s peak, a staggering half a million men – half a million – had flooded into South Africa from around the Empire, the then-biggest military expedition in history. It was the Vietnam War of its day, in which the might of the world’s pre-eminent Superpower was brought to bear upon a vastly outnumbered, supposedly ragtag foe – in this case a bunch of upstart, Dutch-descended settlers.

Today, in Britain country (but not in South Africa), the Boer War has slipped to a historical footnote. Firstly, it was an embarrassment, one internationally condemned – a lop-sided affair in which a vaunted brief victory ended up taking a brutal two-and-a-half years, with thousands of Boer women and children perishing in that brand new construct, the “concentration camp”. Secondly, just twelve years later, came the Great War, a conflict so cataclysmic, and so much closer to home, that this colonial rumble in a far-flung corner of the British Empire became eclipsed.

The causes of the Boer War are complex, its prosecution complicated. But it remains notable for a number of reasons. It began with military tactics redolent of the Napoleonic Wars but ended with the machine guns, trenches and barbed wire that would later become a feature of the Western Front. The war marked the first time that countries like Australia, New Zealand, India and Canada had acted upon the international stage. It was also the first great media war in which the telegraph and telephone were key components; a war that was both photographed and filmed and in which public opinion played a huge part, influenced by “embedded” reporters like Winston Churchill. Not all reaction was positive. It was the first time the Government had had to contend with a substantial anti-war movement.

Importantly, it was also a proxy war, a dress rehearsal for a looming Armageddon. The Boers, armed by the Germans, included all manner of anti-imperial foreign mercenaries in their ranks. Progress was monitored eagerly by American, French and Russian observers. To more sinister end, the African veld became a killing field, a testing ground for battlefield horrors as yet unimaginable.

No Ordinary Killing is not about the Boer War but is a murder mystery, a thriller, set against its backdrop. Away from the military action, Cape Town here is a heaving, exotic port, with thousands of soldiers passing through, either on their way up to the Front, or on leave from it, and the local police hard-pushed to cope. Behind the genteel veneer, it is a city of bars, bordellos, conmen and a crime wave, with a lid clanging on a simmering pot of ethnic tension.

My story gets going when a British Army officer is found dead one night, killed under seemingly strange circumstances, his body dumped on the veranda of his guesthouse. Which is where Captain Ingo Finch comes into the picture. A doctor with the newly formed Royal Army Medical Corps – with the army, but not of the army – he is summoned to sign off on a post mortem, the officer’s death falling between the jurisdictions of the over-burdened Cape Constabulary and the Military Foot Police. The identity of the victim and the swift, too-tidy resolution to the case, prompts Finch to do a bit of amateur sleuthing. Pretty soon our unwitting hero is caught in a web of deadly intrigue and espionage as the machinations of military intelligence click into gear around him.

To me there’s nothing more dramatic than someone thrust in way over their head, plunged into a life-or-death struggle, having to figure out the rules of the game on the hoof (alongside, in this case, a rather feisty accomplice, an Australian nurse called Annie Jones and a refugee diamond mine worker called Mbutu). I very much enjoyed writing it. I do hope you enjoy reading it.

Jeff Dawson

 

Call to Arms: (Kay Hunter British detective crime thriller series Book 5) by Rachel Amphlett @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

Call To Arms cover.png

Call To Arms is another excellent book in the Kay Hunter series. They just go from strength to strength and the regular character’s grow on me more and more with each book.

In Call To Arms Kay returns to work on so called light duties after almost losing her life (you’ll have to read the series!). She find herself acting DI and doesn’t have much time to recover before being faced with a decade old cold case and finding proof to clear her colleague’s name. Her career, and her colleague’s, depends on a positive outcome to this re-opened investigation. What was deemed a tragic motorbike accident, years ago, is looking more and more suspicious as the team revisit family, old friends and witnesses involved at the time and the truth is more shocking than anyone could have ever imagined, me especially!

This is a fast-paced, beautifully written police procedural with twists and turns galore. I love this team, their dedication to one another and the banter they share. They are a very likeable bunch. Kay is a very dedicated detective, but is also very real and believable. I love the small details Rachel Amphlett uses to make her all the more human to the reader, including little habits such as rubbing her right eye when she’s nervous, upset, agitated….. These kind of things really bring a character to life for me.

Every single chapter in this book, and in the series as a whole, makes you have to keep reading. I’ve had to force myself to put it down when other things have had to be done, but trust me, I could have quite happily read this in one sitting.

I can’t wait to read book 6, Gone To Ground.

Via AmazonUK…..

Loyalty has a price.

Kay Hunter has survived a vicious attack at the hands of one of the country’s most evil serial killers.

Returning to work after an enforced absence to recover, she discovers she wasn’t the only victim of that investigation. DI Devon Sharp remains suspended from duties, and the team is in turmoil.

Determined to prove herself once more and clear his name, Kay undertakes to solve a cold case that links Sharp to his accuser.

But as she gets closer to the truth, she realises her enquiries could do more harm than good.

Torn between protecting her mentor and finding out the truth, the consequences of Kay’s enquiries will reach far beyond her new role…

Call to Arms is a gripping police procedural, and the fifth in the Detective Kay Hunter series:

1. SCARED TO DEATH
2. WILL TO LIVE
3. ONE TO WATCH
4. HELL TO PAY
5. CALL TO ARMS

A page-turning murder mystery for fans of Peter Robinson, David Baldacci and Harlen Coben.

Praise for Call to Arms

Call to Arms throws the reader straight into the action, and the pace doesn’t let up until the final page.” ~ Jo’s Book Blog

Call to Arms is a riveting thriller, full of twists and turns, lies and secrets and totally engrossing!” ~ Good n’ Read-y

Call to Arms kept me on the edge of my seat – it’s a real page turner!” ~ Bonnies Book Talk

rachel-amphlettBefore turning to writing, Rachel Amphlett played guitar in bands, worked as a TV and film extra, dabbled in radio as a presenter and freelance producer for the BBC, and worked in publishing as a sub-editor and editorial assistant.

She now wields a pen instead of a plectrum and writes crime fiction and spy novels, including the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the Detective Kay Hunter series.

Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel cites her writing influences as Michael Connelly, Lee Child, and Robert Ludlum. She’s also a huge fan of Peter James, Val McDermid, Angela Marsons, Robert Bryndza, Ken Follett, and Stuart MacBride.

She’s a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers Association, with the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint, and the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag.

Her novels are available in eBook, paperback and audiobook formats from worldwide retailers including Amazon, iBooks, Kobo, and Google Play.

A keen traveller, Rachel holds both EU and Australian passports and can usually be found plotting her next trip two years in advance, usually with a crime fiction festival tacked on for good measure! You can stay in touch with Rachel via her Reader’s Group at http://www.rachelamphlett.com.

Rachel Amphlett’s Amazon Author Page

My reviews for the previous books in the Kay Hunter series…..

Scared to Death (Detective Kay Hunter series Book 1) by @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

Will To Live (Detective Kay Hunter crime thriller series Book 2) by Rachel Amphlett @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

One to Watch: A Detective Kay Hunter mystery, Book 3 by @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

Hell to Pay: (Kay Hunter British detective crime thriller series Book 4) by Rachel Amphlett @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

 

Winter Downs #BookLaunch @Jancoledwards @SoTLibraries @penkhullpress @sot2021

Congratulations to Jan Edwards who has won the Arnold Bennett Book Prize for the wonderful Winter Downs! A very well deserved win! I thought I’d re-blog the lovely memories from the book launch. You will find the link to buy in the original post. I highly recommend you add it to your list, if you haven’t already read it.

Chat About Books

Yesterday I attended Jan Edwards’ book launch for Winter Downs at City Central Library, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent, along with my Mum, Gill and friend, Gayle 🙂  

Those who I am friends with on Facebook may have already seen my photos but I thought I would share them in a blog post as it was such a lovely event!

The launch had a 1940’s tea and cakes theme which was lovely 🙂 (All homemade too!)

It started at 11.30am, where we were greeted with a selection of hot and cold drinks as well as delicious cakes…..

…..We bought our books ready for signing…..

Winter Downs…..then we were treated to a couple of lovely readings…..

…..before the lady herself, Jan Edwards, read us the opening of Winter Downs…..

Afterwards, there was a lovely Q&A. Lots of interesting questions with very articulate answers and some discussion around the room amongst a friendly and supportive…

View original post 82 more words

#Free #Reader #Writer #Event 6X6Writingcafe @Writingcafe6X6 @SoTLibraries with @Jancoledwards & @MishaHerwin

Reminder!

At a loose end this evening? Get yourself down to the library for this lovely quarterly event. It’s always a great evening!

6x6 June

6X6 Reading Café

Tuesday 12 June, 7pm

City Central Library, Hanley

Cost: free

Six writers…six readings…six minutes each. Join us for the ever-popular 6X6 Reading Café, where local authors read and promote their work. You can see details of this month’s writers at the 6X6 blog; everyone is welcome to come, listen and support.

https://6x6writingcafe.wordpress.com/

Contact City Central Library to book your free place

Tel: 01782 238455 Email: central.library@stoke.gov.uk

Hope to see you there!

(Thanks in advance for sharing)

 

Cuttin’ Heads by D.A. Watson @davewatsonbooks #BlogTour #BookPromo & #Giveaway @rararesources

Hiya! 

Today I have the pleasure of joining in with D.A. Watson’s Cuttin’ Heads blog tour.

Cuttin Heads banner

Many thanks as always to Rachel @ Rachel’s Random Resources for the opportunity to take part.

Cuttin’ Heads

Cuttin-Heads-cover

Aldo Evans is a desperate man. Fired from his job and deeply in debt, he struggles to balance a broken family life with his passion for music. Luce Figura is a troubled woman. A rhythmic perfectionist, she is haunted by childhood trauma and scorned by her religiously devout mother. Ross McArthur is a wiseass. Orphaned as an infant and raised by the state, his interests include game shows, home-grown weed, occasional violence and the bass guitar. They are Public Alibi. A rock n’ roll band going nowhere fast. When the sharp-suited, smooth talking producer Gappa Bale offers them a once in a lifetime chance to make their dreams come true, they are caught up in a maelstrom of fame, obsession, music and murder. Soon, Aldo, Luce and Ross must ask themselves: is it really better to burn out than to fade away?

Purchase from Amazon UK –

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cuttin-Heads-D-Watson-ebook/dp/B07CG8DN4V/

Author Bio –

Cutting Heads author

Prizewinning author D.A. Watson spent several years working in bars, restaurants and call centres before going back to university with the half-arsed plan of becoming a music teacher. Halfway through his degree at the University of Glasgow, he discovered he was actually better at writing, and unleashed his debut novel, In the Devil’s Name, on an unsuspecting public in the summer of 2012. Plans of a career in education left firmly in the dust, he later gained his masters degree in Creative Writing from the University of Stirling.  He has since published two more novels, The Wolves of Langabhat and Cuttin’ Heads, a handful of non-fiction pieces, several short stories including Durty Diana, which was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2016, and the Burns parody Tam O’ Shatner, which in 2017 came runner up in the Dunedin Robert Burns Poetry Competition, and was a competition winner at the Falkirk Storytelling Festival.

He lives with his family in Western Scotland.

“The Christoper Brookmyre of horror. Readers will be very very afraid.”  – Louise Welsh, bestselling author of the Plague Times trilogy

Social Media Links –

https://www.facebook.com/dave.watson.books/

https://twitter.com/davewatsonbooks

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5612424.D_A_Watson

Giveaway –

Win a signed copy of Cuttin’ Heads

*Terms and Conditions –Please enter using the Rafflecopter link below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then I reserve the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time I will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

Follow the rest of the Cuttin’ Heads blog tour for reviews, and more, with these awesome book bloggers…..

Cuttin' Heads Full Banner

Enjoy!

Hell to Pay: (Kay Hunter British detective crime thriller series Book 4) by Rachel Amphlett @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

Hell to Pay Cover LARGE EBOOK

Wow, this series just gets better and better, if that’s at all possible! I’ve found myself totally gripped with Hell To Pay, grabbing every chance I’ve had to read it, even if it’s only been a couple of chapters at a time. I have to say though, telling myself ‘just one more chapter’ happened quite regularly whilst reading this book so I’ve read it quite quickly (for me!). I love Rachel Amphlett’s writing style. Her books are so easy to immerse yourself in. If you haven’t read this series as yet, then I highly recommend that you do.

In Hell To Pay Detective Kay Hunter and her team are called to a road traffic accident. They aren’t quite sure why at first until they realise there is a dead body in the boot of the car. The body of a young woman. What they eventually unearth as they investigate this unusual case is nothing short of horrific! Kay’s determination to see this particularly nasty criminal brought to justice puts her in serious danger as he becomes as obsessed with her as she is with him. A storyline which had me holding my breath and my heart racing!

Absolutely brilliantly written. I loved it! It’s fast-paced, with short chapter’s which add to the tension and pace of the story making you NEED to read on. Characterisation is excellent. I feel like I’m getting to know the main character’s quite well now and it almost feels like catching up with old friends when I start the next book in the series. They are real and believable and I find myself really caring about what happens to them. I’ve already started book five – Call To Arms.

Many thanks to Rachel Amphlett for my review copy of Hell To Pay. I highly recommend!

Via Amazon UK…..

Praise for Hell to Pay:

Gripping, pacy, twisty, and suspenseful, this is how all good crime novels should read.” ~ Goodreads

When a road traffic accident on a dark autumn night uncovers a disturbing conspiracy, Detective Sergeant Kay Hunter’s investigation exposes a ruthless serial killer exploiting vulnerable young women.

With her enemies unmasked and her career spiralling out of control, Kay’s determination to seek vengeance for the victims brings her dangerously close to those who want to silence her.

Undeterred, she uncovers the real reason behind a plot to destroy her career and sets in motion a terrifying chain of events.

Could Kay’s need for revenge be her undoing, or will she survive to see justice served?

Hell to Pay is a gripping fast paced crime thriller, and the fourth in the Detective Kay Hunter series:

1. SCARED TO DEATH
2. WILL TO LIVE
3. ONE TO WATCH
4. HELL TO PAY
5. CALL TO ARMS (2018)

A highly addictive serial killer murder mystery for fans of Peter Robinson, David Baldacci and James Patterson.

What reviewers are saying about Hell to Pay

“Hell to Pay was another exciting read that gets your adrenaline going, the pacing is fast and furious and begins on page one and never ends!” ~ Novel Gossip

“Hell to Pay is an absolutely brilliant fire-filled crime story, checking all the boxes of a police procedural”~ Chocolate & Waffles

rachel-amphlett

Before turning to writing, Rachel Amphlett played guitar in bands, worked as a TV and film extra, dabbled in radio as a presenter and freelance producer for the BBC, and worked in publishing as a sub-editor and editorial assistant.

She now wields a pen instead of a plectrum and writes crime fiction and spy novels, including the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the Detective Kay Hunter series.

Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel cites her writing influences as Michael Connelly, Lee Child, and Robert Ludlum. She’s also a huge fan of Peter James, Val McDermid, Angela Marsons, Robert Bryndza, Ken Follett, and Stuart MacBride.

She’s a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers Association, with the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint, and the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag.

Her novels are available in eBook, paperback and audiobook formats from worldwide retailers including Amazon, iBooks, Kobo, and Google Play.

A keen traveller, Rachel holds both EU and Australian passports and can usually be found plotting her next trip two years in advance, usually with a crime fiction festival tacked on for good measure! You can stay in touch with Rachel via her Reader’s Group at http://www.rachelamphlett.com.

Find all of Rachel’s books here…..

Rachel Amphlett’s Amazon Author Page

My reviews of previous books in the Kay Hunter series…..

Scared to Death (Detective Kay Hunter series Book 1) by @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

Will To Live (Detective Kay Hunter crime thriller series Book 2) by Rachel Amphlett @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

One to Watch: A Detective Kay Hunter mystery, Book 3 by @RachelAmphlett #BookReview

 

 

#Rockford #literary #podcast with Dan Klefstad @danklefstad

Hi, I have something a little different for you today…..

There’s a new literary podcast out of Rockford, Illinois, and Dan Klefstad is their first guest. The Rockford Writers’ Guild recorded Dan reading five of his stories, beginning with “The Caretaker” which I reviewed – The Caretaker – A short story by Dan Klefstad @danklefstad. The other four are follow-ups. Dan will record a handful more later this summer. Give them a try — they’re free!

DanPodcast2 - Copy[4309]

Photo courtesy of The Rockford Writers’ Guild

 

Ep.1 “The Caretaker” http://bit.ly/2lx3HyD

Ep. 2 “The Interview” http://bit.ly/2m9HKpX

Ep. 3 “Solstice” http://bit.ly/2D47OJg

Ep. 4 “Wolf at Fiona’s Castle” http://bit.ly/2GCZAKt

Ep. 5  “Hauptsturmführer Fillennius”
http://bit.ly/2E6OSNL

 

Enjoy!

#CoverReveal Gone To Ground (Detective Kay Hunter crime thriller series Book 6) by @RachelAmphlett

Hi all!

Today I am delighted to bring you the cover reveal for Gone To Ground (Detective Kay Hunter crime thriller series Book 6) 🙂

Gone to Ground

(Detective Kay Hunter crime thriller series Book 6)

Imprint: Saxon Publishing

Publication date: 8 July 2018

Availability: Worldwide

ISBN eBook: 978-0-6482355-6-9

ISBN paperback: 978-0-6482355-7-6

ISBN audiobook: 978-0-6482355-8-3

Contact details

Email: info@rachelamphlett.com

Website: www.rachelamphlett.com

Twitter: @RachelAmphlett

Facebook: Rachel Amphlett

Gone to Ground

(Detective Kay Hunter series)

by

Rachel Amphlett

While attending a crime scene on the

outskirts of Maidstone, DI Kay Hunter

makes a shocking discovery.

The victim has been brutally cut to

pieces, his identity unknown.

When more body parts start turning up in

the Kentish countryside, Kay realises the

disturbing truth

a serial killer is at large

and must be stopped at all costs.

With no motive for the murders and a killer

who has gone undetected until now, Kay

and her team of detectives must work fast

to calm a terrified local population.

When a third victim is found, her

investigation grows even more

complicated.

As she begins to expose a dark underbelly

to the county town, Kay and her team are

pulled into a web of jealousy and intrigue

that, if left unchecked, will soon claim

another life.

Gone to Ground

is a gripping serial killer

thriller full of page-turning suspense, and

the sixth book in the

Detective Kay Hunter

British detective series:

Check this out ⇓⇓⇓

 

Gone To Ground cover

Love it!

Out on 8th July 2018!

If you haven’t already, read the previous books in the series now…..

1. Scared to Death

2. Will to Live

3. One to Watch

4. Hell to Pay

5. Call to Arms

6. Gone to Ground

Rachel Amphlett’s Amazon Author Page

Enjoy!

About the author…..

rachel-amphlett

Before turning to writing, Rachel Amphlett played guitar in bands, worked as a TV and film extra, dabbled in radio as a presenter and freelance producer for the BBC, and worked in publishing as a sub-editor and editorial assistant.

She now wields a pen instead of a plectrum and writes crime fiction and spy novels, including the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the Detective Kay Hunter series.

Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel cites her writing influences as Michael Connelly, Lee Child, and Robert Ludlum. She’s also a huge fan of Peter James, Val McDermid, Angela Marsons, Robert Bryndza, Ken Follett, and Stuart MacBride.

She’s a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers Association, with the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint, and the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag.

Her novels are available in eBook, paperback and audiobook formats from worldwide retailers including Amazon, iBooks, Kobo, and Google Play.

A keen traveller, Rachel holds both EU and Australian passports and can usually be found plotting her next trip two years in advance, usually with a crime fiction festival tacked on for good measure! You can stay in touch with Rachel via her Reader’s Group at http://www.rachelamphlett.com.

#Interview with #author Deborah Sheldon @OscillateWPress

Hiya!

Today I have the pleasure of welcoming Deborah Sheldon to Chat About Books.

Deborah Sheldon

Many thanks to Claire Fitzpatrick, Senior Developmental Editor @ Oscillate Wildly Press (http://www.oscillatewildlypress.com) for arranging the following interview…..

For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

I’m a professional writer from Melbourne, Australia. I write short stories, novellas and novels across the darker spectrum of horror, crime and noir. My releases, through several publishing houses, include the dark literary collection 300 Degree Days and Other Stories, the bio-horror novella Thylacines, the dark fantasy and horror collection Perfect Little Stitches and Other Stories, the romance-suspense novella The Long Shot, the bio-horror novel Devil Dragon, and the crime noir novellas Dark Waters and Ronnie and Rita.

My short fiction has appeared in many well-respected magazines such as Quadrant, Island, Aurealis, SQ Mag, and Midnight Echo. My work has been shortlisted for numerous Aurealis Awards and Australian Shadows Awards, long-listed for a Bram Stoker Award, and included in “best of” anthologies. Other credits include TV scripts, feature articles, non-fiction books, stage plays, and award-winning medical writing.

Where do you get your ideas from?

Everywhere. Most nights after dinner, I trawl the Internet, looking for oddities that I can use as a springboard. For example, my short story “Angel hair” (which was nominated for an Aurealis Award, I’m happy to say!) came from a feature article about the phenomenon of spiders floating on their silks to escape floodwaters. I had major surgery in January, so I used this experience as fodder for an as-yet-unpublished psychological- and body-horror story. I’m often inspired by memories, dreams, nightmares, hurtful words. Very rarely, I come up with a title first and find the story later. My flash fiction “Post hoc ergo propter hoc” came about this way. It is Latin for “After this therefore because of this”, which is a type of logical fallacy that mistakes correlation with causation. It took me a few years to find the story to fit that title.

Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

It helps to have an idea of what my characters look like. Sometimes, I’ll pick someone I have known or else seen on TV. Occasionally, I’ll notice a stranger and be so taken by their appearance that I’ll file them away for future reference. Just a single trait will often do the trick: a person’s gait, posture, or a distinguishing characteristic such as an interesting beard.

However, I never base a character on the personality of anyone I know. My characters have to fit my plots and themes.

How do you pick your character names?

I’m guided by my character’s sex, ethnicity, age and socioeconomic status. I also have a baby name book that includes 50,000 names from around the world, so I’m never short of inspiration.

Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?

First comes the initial idea. For example, in my short story “Across the white desert”, I wanted to focus on the technique of writing an action-adventure story centred around a chase. Ultimately, I chose Antarctica because it is a treeless expanse with nowhere to hide; I built up the story elements from the setting. Other times, my idea is based on something in the real world. For example, I wanted to write about de-extinction science and my research led me to write my bio-horror novella Thylacines. It’s about a genetically-engineered litter of an extinct Australian dog-like species known as the Tasmanian tiger.

I rewrite as I go along. Moving forward in my first draft is impossible unless I’m happy with what I’ve already written. Once I’ve completed my manuscript, I let it sit for a few weeks, then edit ruthlessly. Beta readers and professional editors are, in my opinion, essential before submitting any manuscript to a publisher.

Who are your top five favourite authors?

Only five? That’s a tough one! With apologies to the dozens of authors I admire, respect and love, I would have to choose (in no particular order) Annie Proulx, Daphne du Maurier, Ernest Hemingway, Raymond Chandler and Stephen King.

If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?

Homer, the legendary author of The Iliad and The Odyssey. I wouldn’t have any question in particular to ask. Instead, I’d just tell him that his works are still read and revered some 29 centuries after he wrote them. Wow, can you imagine his reaction? The look on his face? I’d probably take along smelling salts – he’d need them to recover from his faint.

Were you a big reader as a child?

Reading was – and still is – my number one hobby. From a young age, I always had my nose in a book. As a little girl, my favourite books were by Enid Blyton. During primary school, I became interested in science and medicine. By the time I hit my teens, I was a sci-fi addict.

When did you start to write?

Before I knew my letters. I used to draw my stories instead. They all had essentially the same plot: someone gets kidnapped by a bad guy and then a team (including animal sidekicks such as dogs and birds) would rescue them. Not very sophisticated but, in my defence, I was only about three or four years old!

By the age of 11, I knew I was a writer. At 18, I sold my first piece of writing – a feature article on steroid abuse – to a bodybuilding magazine. That was during my first year at university, and I’ve been writing professionally ever since.

If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?

That’s a difficult question. The books I hold close to my heart are, in their various ways, perfect to me, including their endings. I’m an admirer of noir, where the endings are never happy. Those that make me cry are, paradoxically, the best kind. I want fiction to move me. If I felt the need to rewrite the ending of a book, chances are I’d have wanted to rewrite the whole thing because I didn’t like it.

Is there a book you wish you had written?

Oh, so many. Every book that imprints itself on my heart is one that I wish I had written, if only to have it closer to me. I’d love to have been privy to the creative processes.

If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?

I’m very private, so the idea of writing an autobiography is excruciating; akin to parading naked in the streets. But, if I had to come up with a title, it would be something like: I Did the Best I Could and underneath in smaller text: (Considering the Circumstances).

If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?

Raymond Chandler’s famed detective, Philip Marlowe. I’d take him to a little hole-in-the-wall dive in an out-of-the-way place, maybe in one of Melbourne’s dim, graffitied back lanes, and make sure the barista had a bottle of bourbon to liven up Marlowe’s coffee.

Tell us a random fact about yourself.

I love solving cryptic crosswords.

What are you working on right now?

A range of short stories. A few will be kept aside for inclusion in my dark fiction retrospective collection (as yet untitled) due for release in 2019. The others I’ll submit to horror and spec-fic magazines as I complete them. Later in the year, I intend to start on a novel in a horror subgenre I’ve never attempted before. Should be fun, I hope!

Tell us about your latest release?

300 Degree Days and Other Stories is a petite collection. First published in March 2014 by Ginninderra Press, it was re-released by Oscillate Wildly Press in February 2018. It’s available as an ebook and in paperback.

The back-cover blurb reads:

Sometimes, the ties that bind are sharp enough to cut. In these eleven stories, set in contemporary Australian suburbia, Deborah Sheldon examines the darker side of family relationships. Unsettling and incisively written, each story of betrayal, envy, loss or bad blood resonates for a long time after reading.

Do you have a new release due?

In September 2018, IFWG Publishing Australia will release my horror novel Contrition. I’m pleased to say that the cover design is by Bram Stoker Award-winning artist, Greg Chapman.

The back-cover blurb reads:

In her late teens, Meredith Berg-Olsen had had all the makings of a runway model. Now in her late forties, after everything she had been through – including horrors that John could only guess at – she looked bloodless instead of pale, skeletal instead of slender, more dead than alive… John Penrose has two secrets. One is the flatmate he keeps hidden from the world: his high-school sweetheart, Meredith. His other secret is the reason he feels compelled to look after her. Contrition is a horror story with noir undertones and an atmosphere of mounting dread.

What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?

I always have a few drinks! Chardonnay is my tipple of choice. My husband and son like to take me out to dinner.

How can readers keep in touch with you?

I have a monthly newsletter that includes updates and ebook giveaways. The signup button is on my website: http://deborahsheldon.wordpress.com

I’m not on Facebook personally, but one of my publishers, IFWG Publishing Australia, runs a page on my behalf: https://www.facebook.com/Deborah-Sheldon-936388749723500/

I love being friended on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3312459.Deborah_Sheldon

And I try to keep my Amazon author page up-to-date: https://www.amazon.com/Ms-Deborah-Sheldon/e/B0035MWQ98/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

Reader reviews on Amazon or Goodreads mean a great deal to authors and publishers. Please consider leaving a review after reading a book, whether your opinion is good, bad or indifferent. Feedback – of all kinds – is very much appreciated.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, Deborah 🙂

And thank you so much for having me on your blog. Your questions were really thought-provoking!

300 Degree Days cover

‘Sheldon’s stories lift the skin of small, suburban lives to expose the raw nerves beneath. Her writing is intimate, compelling and alarming…’ – The Short Review, UK.

Sometimes, the ties that bind are sharp enough to cut. In these eleven stories, set in contemporary Australian suburbia, Deborah Sheldon examines the darker side of family relationships. Unsettling and incisively written, each story of betrayal, envy, loss or bad blood resonates for a long time after reading.

Enjoy!